Hartford House

The Home of Good Conversation, Fine Wine and Classic Horses.

Award-winning hotel and restaurant situated at Summerhill Stud on the picturesque KwaZulu-Natal Midlands Meander, South Africa.

Filtering by Tag: Rhino Conservation

WORLD RHINO DAY

White Rhino / Lotus Head (p)

White Rhino / Lotus Head (p)

Friday 22 September 2011

Friday 22nd September is World Rhino Day. It's a signal of the sad world we live in, where man's greed has placed one of the most ancient creatures on earth in danger of extinction.

At the Summerhill Stallion Day just over two months ago, it was Hartford's privilege, together with its associates in the Land Of Legends (www.landoflegends.co.za), to bestow upon the greatest rhino conservationist of them all, Dr. Ian Player, an Ingwazi Award, in recognition not only of his tireless (and remarkably successful) efforts to save the rhino, but for what he's done in the upliftment of all our lives in this region, and elsewhere.

World Rhino Day is special for anyone who lives where we do, and has the slightest understanding of the value of balance in the ecological scheme of things.

DR IAN PLAYER CALLS FOR RHINO HORN TRADE DEBATE

The Endangered Rhino / Land Rover (p)

The Endangered Rhino / Land Rover (p)

"INGWAZI HONOUR GUEST IN THE NEWS"

Sunday, the 3rd July is a big day in the histories of Hartford House and the Land of Legends. We are honouring the Premier of KZN, Dr Zweli Mkhize and Dr Ian Player, the latter of whom is remembered as the saviour or the world's rhino populations. The tireless Ian Player was in the news again this week:

Fifty years after spearheading an international drive to save the white rhino from extinction, world-renowned wildlife conservationist Ian Player has set the cat among the pigeons by calling for an urgent national debate on whether to legalise the controlled trading of rhino horns.

Player - one of the central figures in the 1960's Zululand battle to save the world's last remaining white rhinos from extinction - suggested that re-opening legal trade in horns might be the only way to save the continent’s rhinos from the recent "catastrophic" wave of illegal rhino poaching by syndicates.

"Make no mistake, we are up against some very dark forces which threaten to overwhelm us," he told business people at an anti-poaching fundraiser in Durban Tuesday.

Noting that powdered rhino horn had been used in Oriental traditional medicine for several thousand years, the 84-year-old wildlife ambassador said: "Nothing is going to stop the deep-seated belief systems in the Far East. So we need to debate in all possible forums the merits and demerits of selling these horns legally… In the end, it may be the only way to save the rhino."

Extract from The Mercury