Hartford House

The Home of Good Conversation, Fine Wine and Classic Horses.

Award-winning hotel and restaurant situated at Summerhill Stud on the picturesque KwaZulu-Natal Midlands Meander, South Africa.

Filtering by Category: Hartford House Suites

ELLIS SUITE 4 AT HARTFORD HOUSE

Hartford House Ellis Suite 4
(Photos : Sally Chance)

Ellis Suite 4

This suite is named for the Ellis family, who occupied the Hartford property from 1939 to 1990, when they exchanged the property with the Goss family for their home in Hillcrest near Durban. Raymond Ellis snr. was a property developer in Durban, and owned much of what is now known as Durban North. He was also a prominent hotelier, remembered for his proprietorship of the Fairhaven and Rydal Mount Hotels on Durban's Golden Mile, as well as being the founder of what is today South Africa's biggest brick-making business, Corobrick. Hartford was the Ellis country retreat, and they started breeding racehorses here in 1941.

The racing achievements of the Ellises, who proceeded to develop one of the greatest racehorse-breeding dynasties in history, were described by the famous author Sir Mordaunt Milner as ranking alongside those of Lord Derby, the Aga Khan, Coolmore and the Sheikhs Maktoum in the United Kingdom, Marcel Boussac in France, Senor Tesio in Italy, the Hancocks and the Phippses in the United States, and the Inghams in Australia.

From these historic pastures, they bred, raised and trained the winners of every major race on the South African racing calendar, and in their era, they were indomitable.

Once the sleeping quarters of Mick and Cheryl Goss' daughter Bronwyn, in more recent times, Ellis has accommodated His Majesty King Letsie III of Lesotho, ruling monarch of the Mountain Kingdom, during his visits to Summerhill Stud, where he keeps several horses which feed his and his nation’s passion for the equine species.

Its artworks include an example by one of the greatest of South African artists, the late Errol Boyley, who is remembered here by the painting of a horse and his groom after a thunderstorm at Summerhill Stud (the main farm). Errol, who was a great friend of Summerhill and Hartford, has several other major works adorning the walls of the manor house.

This suite is often reserved by travellers who knew Hartford while it was still a private home, and its popularity has survived the subtle but extensive developmental changes to the other accommodation which have taken place at Hartford in the past decade, aimed at the increasing comfort of our treasured guests.

hartford house logo

For more information please visit :
www.hartford.co.za

GOSSLING SUITE 3 AT HARTFORD HOUSE

Gossling Suite 3

Most recently occupied by Mick and Cheryl Goss' youngest son, Nicholas, this suite's most famous resident from the past was Mrs. Bridget Oppenheimer, the first lady of South African racing, and arguably the First Lady of South African society for decades as the wife of the late, great Harry Oppenheimer.

In the days before heaters became voguish, and in the context of the Ellis era and a somewhat spartan approach to their furnishings, Mrs. Oppenheimer spent her first visit at Hartford in this room. She once remarked to Mick Goss that she was so cold (at the height of winter) that she used to go to bed in her fur coat! That has all changed of course, and we trust your comfort will not be compromised by a lack of warmth.

Since the re-opening of Hartford House as a hospitality establishment in 1997, this little suite has provided access for many a young couple, a Michaelhouse, Hilton or Treverton student, the odd granny or grandpa and several storied tour guides, fabled aviators and historians, among the most celebrated of whom was our late and greatly lamented friend, David Rattray.

It's our smallest suite, but it's been the debutant introduction for countless enduring relationships and visitations to Hartford House, and its popularity has survived the subtle but extensive developmental changes in the rest of our accommodation during the past decade, all aimed at the increasing comfort of our treasured guests.

hartford house logo

For more information please visit :
www.hartford.co.za

MOOR SUITE 1 AT HARTFORD HOUSE

Hartford House Moor Suite 1
(Photos : Sally Chance)

Moor Suite 1

Named for the Moor family, who occupied Hartford from 1875 to 1937, and in particular the two brothers, John and Frederick. John Moor was the member of parliament for Weenen County in the old Natal Colonial government, as well as a Senator in the first South African government, and was responsible for most of the development at Hartford. His brother, Sir Frederick Moor, was the last prime minister of the Colony of Natal prior to Union. He was the only man to emerge from the Union talks in 1908 with a knighthood, for his efforts in bringing about what we know today as the Republic of South Africa.

In its time, Moor has accommodated two Prime Ministers, the last of the colony of Natal, and the first of the Union of South Africa, General Louis Botha.

Of interest in this suite is the old marble bath, which was reputedly imported into South Africa from Malaysia towards the latter end of the 18th century, then found its way into the Durban Club, and eventually into this bathroom, together with the old church window installed alongside.

One of South Africa's greatest artists, the late Errol Boyley, is remembered throughout the manor house in numerous fine examples, several of which were included in the compendium of his best works. Errol was a great friend of Summerhill and Hartford, and, somewhat unusually for this committed landscapist, he also portrayed Cheryl Goss in two portraits which appear in this suite.

hartford house logo

For more information please visit :
www.hartford.co.za

AFRICAN ELEGANCE AND SUPERB HAUTE CUISINE

View from Hartford's Ezulweni Suites / Sally Chance (p)

View from Hartford's Ezulweni Suites / Sally Chance (p)

"A VISIT TO HARTFORD HOUSE"
By Michael Green

Not the way you would want to dine every day, but as an occasional treat, oh yes! (Review by Michael Green - former Independent Newspapers Editor)

About half a century ago, when I was a young journalist in London, I lived for a time at Miss Moor's Private Hotel in Craven Hill, Bayswater. I wasn't there for long; it was fairly expensive and I soon moved to more modest quarters

Miss Moor was rather a grand lady. She sent for  me on my first day at her hotel, checked on my appearance and manners,  and offered me a sherry as an introduction to London. I later discovered  that she was a daughter of the last prime minister of Natal, Sir  Frederick Moor (1853-1927), who held office before the Union of South  Africa was formed in 1910.

Sometimes a wheel turns full circle,  albeit very slowly. Recently I visited for the first time Hartford  House, the celebrated boutique hotel and restaurant near Mooi River, 160  kilometres from Durban. It was once the country home of Sir Frederick  Moor (and, presumably, of Miss Moore of the private hotel, one of his  seven children).

This gem of the Natal Midlands was built on  land granted by Queen Victoria to Frederick Moor's family in the late  19th century. Today it is part of a large estate embracing Summerhill,  the racing stud where many of South Africa's champion racehorses have  been born.

Hartford House itself has been splendidly preserved  and modernised where necessary. It is a stately story late Victorian  building with heavy sash windows, big rooms, high ceilings, brass  fittings, teak and mahogany cupboards.

In terms of accommodation  Hartford has 15 suites, but most of these are in additional more recent  buildings standing amid the garden's immaculate lawns. My wife and I  spent the night in the main building, in the Ellis suite, named after a  famous racing family who owned the property from 1939 to 1990, when they  sold it to the present owners, Mick and Cheryl Goss.

The  furnishings were intriguing. The suite had a very big bathroom with an  old-fashioned bath standing on its four feet more or less in the middle.  In a corner, however, was a modern shower. The brass taps at the two  hand-basins looked as if they had been installed by Sir Frederick  himself, but there was plenty of hot water. In the bedroom was a  fireplace and the widest double bed I have ever seen, one that would fit  those old hill-billy stories:  "When pa says turn, we all turn".

Victorian space and elegance, but with electric wall heating panels and  a television set and a refrigerator and a well-stocked bar.

It  is, however, largely the restaurant that attracts visitors from all over  the country, especially at weekends, when Hartford's 30 beds are all  taken. Meals are served in the house's capacious old dining room or on  its wide verandah.

We dined in the dining room and it was a  two-hour, five-course event. Hartford's chef is Jackie Cameron, a very  good-looking, trim blonde who is still in her twenties. She was a  student of Christina Martin, who died recently, and she has been at  Hartford for nine years, in which time she has earned great praise from  critics who know much more about food than I do. She appeared at the  start of the dinner to explain what we were having, and she later  returned to chat to the customers.

It is a set five-course menu  for dinner, and this is what we had: roasted tomato soup with coconut  sorbet; duo of trout with avocado, deep-fried seaweed, caviar, lavender  flowers and frozen apple;  shiitake crusted beef fillet with caramelised  red onions, pommes amandines and exotic mushrooms:  Midlands cheeses;   tart marshmallows. Pommes amandines are potato croquettes with an almond  flavouring.

It sounds a vast meal, but helpings are nouvelle  cuisine; you have room for all of them in the end. It is all delicious,  and quite adventurous for a conservative diner like myself.  I mean,  when did you last eat seaweed, or have coconut with your tomato soup? If  you tell them about special dietary requirements they adjust to the  situation.

Needless to say, all this is not cheap; Hartford House is not economy class. The dinner costs R370 a head. Breakfast the next  day is wonderfully varied and elaborate but this is included in the  hotel's B&B rate, which ranges from R550 to R2,030 per person per  day.

The dinner wine list is appropriately upmarket, with  imposing items at imposing prices. Wines by the glass are R40 to R65 for  reds and R30 to R55 for whites. Here are some of the prices for white  wine by the bottle:  sauvignon blanc R160 to R320 (the latter being  Shannon 2007, from Elgin);  chardonnay R160 to R390 (Springfield Methode  Ancienne, from Robertson).

And for reds by the bottle: cabernet  sauvignon R210 to R550 (Kanonkop 2008, from Stellenbosch);  shiraz R180  to R290 (Hartenberg, from Stellenbosch);  merlot (R190) to R430  (Veenwouden 2007, from Paarl). I ordered a bottle of De Grendel shiraz for R180 and we were very happy with it.

Almost all the wines on  the Hartford list are rated four or five stars in the Platter wine  guide.  Four stars means "excellent", five stars "superlative, a  classic". The wine glasses were beautiful, long-stemmed, wafer-thin, and  the service was first-rate.

There is plenty to do at Hartford apart from eating and drinking. By arrangement you can visit the  Summerhill Stud, which includes the stallions of the Rulers of Dubai.  You can ride horses yourself (but not the stallions). The estate has  splendid gardens, a swimming pool, tennis courts, conference facilities  and a chapel. Other attractions within reasonable distance include  fishing; a game conservancy;  a "wellness centre" offering body  treatments, facials and a sauna;  tours of Drakensberg sites such as  Giant's Castle and Kamberg;  hot air ballooning;  helicopter flights;   Zulu dancing.  Many of these activities are of course by arrangement.

I  would guess, however, that the biggest attraction is that elegant old  dining room and its superb haut cuisine. Not the way you would want to  dine every day, but as an occasional treat, oh yes!

Extract from Artsmart - Art News from KwaZulu-Natal

BLISSFUL MEMORIES ON THE MIDLANDS MEANDER

Hartford Restaurant KZN Midlands

Hartford House Restaurant

THE MEMORIES WILL LAST A LIFETIME

It’s always gratifying to receive feedback from guests who stay at Hartford House, as an enormous amount of effort goes into making every guest’s stay a memorable one. It was therefore with deep appreciation that we received these reviews via the Tripadvisor.com website.

We spent only 24 hours at Hartford House, but the memories will last a lifetime. From the moment we arrived and were offered a complimentary cocktail, we knew we had arrived somewhere special. The location was beautiful, tranquil and instantly relaxing.

We stayed in the Inkanyezi suite, which was a very impressive rondavel, built by locals, which was situated overlooking the fishing dam, with our own private plunge pool.

The accommodation was very special, from the 8 foot circular bed, to the bath for two (in which we drank champagne from the mini bar!) and the views and the sunloungers, all of which made us feel very special! We also had treatments at the wellness centre which contributed to our overall feeling of well being.

The food was out of this world, with the five course dinner a highlight. The restaurant was voted best Restaurant in South Africa in 2009 and this honour is well deserved. It was without doubt the best meal we have ever eaten. Save room for breakfast though, as this is equally impressive!

As you probably realise, we were impressed with this place, but quite apart from the quality of the accommodation and food, what impressed us most was the courage and determination of the owners and their Zulu staff to make a success of Hartford House and in an area of enormous unemployment and poverty, they are creating an amazing success story. Go there, support their efforts and have an experience you won't forget.

 

 ABSOLUTE BLISS

hartford house siyabonga suite lounge

Siyabonga Suite Lounge

We spent one night at Hartford House in the Siyabonga suite for a special celebration, our stay was absolute bliss, from our drive to the hotel passing beautiful green scenery to our departure after breakfast on Sunday morning. From the minute you enter the gates absolute silence and beauty greet you, everywhere you look you see evidence to detail, the grounds are in pristine condition, the gardens a gorgeous riot of colour. The main house is well maintained and has beautiful furniture and exquisite mouldings and even stained glass on the ceilings. Check in was smooth, we were given a refreshing drink, while a few details were filled in.

The Siyabonga suite is one of the stand alone cottages at the dam edge, it has its own little splash pool with a water feature and an outdoor area, including 2 hammocks, overlooking the dam. The suite itself is big with a separate lounge area, lovely bedroom and dressing area, the bathroom has 2 stand alone baths as well as a separate wet room with a rain shower. The suite was clean and well maintained. The walks through the property were amazing, being able to get so close to the horses was very special.

Saturday dinner is an event at Hartford, with live entertainment by Zulu dancers, however unfortunately for us there was a problem and the dancers could not turn up, but Mick’s beautiful story telling made us proud to be South African and we learned more about our country’s as well as Hartford’s rich history. The food was sublime, Jackie is truly a star, she accommodated us with our dietry requirements, so we were able to enjoy a gastronomic feast. The staff were friendly and attentive.

When we got back to our room, the staff had been to turn down the bed, the chocolates were delicious and the rose petals on the bed and in the bath made us feel very special.

Sunday breakfast was not the usual buffet but another gastronomic feast.

Sadly we had to leave, but the peace and tranquillity of the place refreshed our souls.

SIYABONGA, BAKHITI

silver spoon

REFLECTIONS IN A SILVER SPOON

I’m sitting in what is about to become my wife’s new bedroom, in a new house. “Hers” it became when we passed the budget for the third time!

The fold-away doors, all 8 metres of them, have given way to a World Heritage site. To my left lies Ntaba Nquno, where General Botha took command of the Boer forces in November 1899. His predecessor, General Joubert, hero of the first Anglo Boer War, had been wounded the day before at the Battle of Willow Grange, hence the change in O.C.

In the foreground lies one of the planet’s most enchanting valleys, and right here beneath this great hillside, lies the nation’s Champion Racehorse stud. Now I know what the British, the Zulus and the Boers were fighting so furiously about. This is God’s own, and they fought more ferociously for this territory than they did for any other.

Think about that. The British at the time, held dominion over two thirds of the earth’s surface, yet here is where the Empire engaged itself so earnestly, for its greatest military moments, as well as its worst. Since starting this note, I’ve had to walk across the courtyard at the rear of this house, and besides realising my wife got carried away with the size (our plans are simply jotted on the back of exam pads in this part of Zululand, so it’s easy to miscalculate), I also know that, for once in my life, I got really lucky. I married a genius.

The lakeside suites at Hartford House have long borne testimony to her creative talents. The occupancies tell us that, and the admiration of both the architectural and the decorating world confirm it. But “her” house is surely her finest moment.

That said, it really is larger than it should be, and perched beautifully as it is, it’s also a bit on the conspicuous side for a Zulu farmer who still comes to work in a Corsa bakkie, clad in khakis and veldskoens. So I’ve spent the morning planting trees to “hide” it a little!. Equally, this was not the time to be building, though it’s been a 2.5 year project for all the interruptions my management have brought on my builders in the time. You never want to be “splashing out” on a personal indulgence when there are others in pain. The timing was not good, though it might’ve been, had we completed it in 2007 when we first started. My team keeps saying, “purge your conscience, you’ve slaved for it”. I’m consoled only slightly. But it’s to them that Cheryl and I turn with our thanks. In our time here, they’ve run the hard yards with us, they made the sacrifices and at last, they’ve too, reaped their rewards.

Siyabonga, Bakhiti

HARTFORD HOUSE REVIEWS ON TRIPADVISOR.COM

wedding at hartford house kwazulu natal south africa

A Hartford Wedding

A WONDERFUL HOTEL FOR A WEDDING
Durban, South Africa

 It’s always gratifying to receive feedback from guests who stay aHartford House, as an enormous amount of effort goes into making every guest’s stay a memorable one.  It was therefore with deep appreciation that we received these reviews via theripadvisor.com website.

We booked Hartford House for my daughter’s wedding.  We took over the whole hotel for two nights. What an unbelievable experience! All the guests from the United Kingdom and South Africa thought it was a very romantic location for a wedding. 

The food we had at the reception was, as expected, excellent. The accommodation in the suites which overlook the lake was out of this world.  I do not think I have stayed in a room anywhere in the world as large as the one at Hartford House.  We also took advantage of the guided tour of the stud farm which was very interesting and informative. 

My daughter could not have had a better wedding experience. The staff could not do enough for us during our stay.  A highlight was the performance by a local group of young Zulu dancers which the hotel arranged for the evening before the wedding.  They were the best we’ve seen.

FABULOUS HARTFORD HOUSE
London, England

hartford house south africa ezulweni lake suites

Ezulweni Lake Suites

During our stay I mentioned to the manager that they should put Hartford House on the TripAdvisor site, and I’m glad she did!

This is a fabulous place for ambience, countryside views, peace and tranquillity and excellent food.  We were lucky that, while we were there, a top South African jockey and his family were staying and, together with them, we had a guided tour of the stud farm with Mick Goss, the owner. They look after and breed for many of the top owners in the world. The horses are amazing! There are just fields of mares and foals.

They have several rooms, the best definitely being the suites which overlook the fishing dam which is quite good for fly-fishing. My husband also went on a fly-fishing trip on the small trout rivers nearby which were demanding but, apparently, very good.

I would thoroughly recommend Hartford House.

WONDERFUL COUNTRY ESTATE
Cape Town, South Africa

hartford house south africa siyabongo suite bedroom

Siyabonga Suite 15 Bedroom

We booked at Hartford House in Natal for 2 nights, due to the fact that the on-site restaurant was voted as one of the Top 10 restaurants in South Africa.

The Siyabonga Suite we stayed in is completely separate from the whole estate, overlooking the dam. The suite itself was massive with a complete lounge with fireplace, entrance area, and a big bedroom with seating space. The bathroom was the cherry-on-top with 2 freestanding baths next to each other for bathing. A massive shower room with separate toilet and dressing area completed the suite. Everything in the suite was in neutral earthy colours and our suite even had a grass roof. The materials used to build the suite were made by the locals with their local building materials.

The main building is absolutely beautiful. The building is still the old original sandstone farmhouse. Inside, portions of the ceilings are even stained glass, which lets light through during the day and is absolutely amazing. The main building houses the restaurant, lounge, porch and breakfast area. Everything has old world charm, yet is updated with modern style and done tastefully. It is a beautiful house.

The estate itself is on a working stud farm and apparently breeds some of the best horses in the world. We did see some horses and it's understandable why. The estate is massive with every inch of ground manicured to perfection.

The highlight of our stay, however, was the restaurant. Being avid “foodies”, the dinner and breakfasts during our stay were mouth-watering sensations each time. I'm not going into detail, but each course was made with fresh ingredients from the estate and had a perfect combination of tastes. Even breakfast was a three-course meal, and not the normal buffet with a selection of everything. The three-course breakfast was a refreshing experience with exquisite combinations.

All in all, this estate combines everything perfectly. The proximity to the Drakensberg is also very nice, as it's only 50kms from Giant's Castle.

We loved our stay here and will be back again and again.

Emanzini Suite 11 at Hartford House

Emanzini Suite 11 / Hartford House (p)

Emanzini Suite 11 / Hartford House (p)

We are blessed on our farms with an abundance of water, with numerous underground springs spread across the length and breadth of the property. The word Emanzini means “at the waterside” in Zulu, and this suite takes its name from its proximity to the swimming pool, the Wellness Centre and the springs. . “The Springs” was also the name of the farm in East Griqualand on which Pat Goss snr. founded his renowned racehorse breeding enterprise in the 1930’s.

Emanzini was one of the first exercises in building with bricks and mortar for our previously unskilled Zulus, who in our opinion, made an excellent job of what seemed like an impossible task when we first set out.

This suite fronts onto the old wisteria pergola, which dates back to the foundation of the Manor House, in 1875. The Moors, who were the first occupants of Hartford as we know it, initiated a habit of giving to each other a plant or a piece of garden statuary or ornamentation on wedding anniversaries, and the pergola was one of the first of these. Since then, the Ellises and the Gosseshave perpetuated this rather quaint habit, and most of what you see in the garden today came about as a result.

Tempest de Frederickz 90th birthday celebration

Tempest de Frederickz

Tempest de Frederickz

Last Sunday witnessed another gathering of Hartford connected people, this time the 90th birthday of Tempest de Frederickz, (who was born Ellis in 1918). The Ellis family acquired Hartford as long ago as 1939, and they lived here until early 1990, when the Gosses took over.

During that time, Raymond Ellis Snr manifested his all-conquering racing operation on the farm, and proceeded as an owner/breeder to outstrip the achievements of any of his kind in all of history. From this property, the Ellises bred, raised and trained the winners of every major race on the South African racing calendar, and enjoyed the recognition from no less an author than Sir Mordaunt Milner, as ranking with the all-time elite of the private breeding and racing game. They’re the only South Africans in history to enjoy mention in the same breath as the Aga Khan, Lord Derby and the Sheikh’s Maktoum in English racing, Coolmore in Ireland, France’s Boussac and Italy’s Tesio, and America’s Hancocks and Phippses.

Besides being sterling breeders, the Ellis family were richly endowed when it came to the arts, and Tempest was reputedly a fine musician, while Graeme Ellises’ “The Duck Pond: Midnight” reveals his prowess.

THE DUCK POND: MIDNIGHT

Tonight, if you will walk beyond that lonely tree
And stand quite still, perhaps you'll see
Cloud shadows spun by moonlight; cool
Breezes lulling sleepy flowers;
Three ducks splashing silver in the pool
To while away the evening hours;
And at the water's moon-kissed brink,
Two sleepy cranes that sit and think
Of summers spent in unknown lands,
And waves that lap on silver sands.
By Graham Ellis - 1943

Written at Hartford

The Perfect Midlands Meander Destination

breakfast view

"Breakfast on the verandah, overlooking the beautiful gardens, is also a highlight of any visit to Hartford..."

“For a moment, there’s a lull in the noise of the city. Bird song comes to the fore, a hadeda is heard overhead and for a few seconds my mind retreats to Hartford. This is a place so special that even being transported for a few seconds brings refreshment from the busy pace of life.

There are so many aspects to Hartford House and each of them has the special qualities that combine to make one’s stay unforgettable, however many times one visits. It is the personalities of you, Mick and Cheryl, your vision, enthusiasm and guidance that has made Hartford so special.

On entry down the long driveway with fields and paddocks on either side and Giant’s Castle up to the left, life begins to slow after our four hour drive from Joburg or three hours from the South Coast. The smiling welcome at the gate and then the warmth and friendliness of the staff on arrival and throughout one’s stay at Hartford gives a relaxed comfortable feeling to new visitors and those like us who return as often as we do. The people in the office, the front staff, Jackie and the kitchen staff, housekeeping and gardeners are equally friendly and are genuinely happy greeting visitors.

Then there are the gorgeous rooms into which you have put so much thought and detail, each so different but equally comfortable. We have stayed in every room you have and it’s always exciting on arrival, to see which room will be ours. Nothing has been spared and one feels the luxury of indulgence relaxing in the room or sitting outdoors enjoying the tranquility of the surroundings.

Dinner is always the most special delight and, I think, the best in South Africa. Comparing meals with some top restaurants in Europe, Hartford is still the best. Breakfast on the verandah, overlooking the beautiful gardens, is also a highlight of any visit to Hartford and the menu is amazing.

After the indulgence and tranquility of a Hartford stay, one reluctantly leaves, knowing there will be a time to visit again, and in between visits, cut out the noise of life and transport oneself back for a moment of peace.”

Said by a connoisseur.Veronica Jagoe (and husband Sean) are veterans of more than 150 visits to Hartford House (yes, that’s about a dozen a year, every year, since we opened).Apart from being our most treasured guests, they’re also among the nicest.And they must have taste!

Moor Suite 1 at Hartford House

Moor Suite Bedroom / Hartford House

Moor Suite Bedroom / Hartford House

Named for the Moor family, who occupied Hartford from 1875 to 1937, and in particular the two brothers, John and Frederick. John Moor was the member of parliament for Weenen County in the old Natal Colonial government, as well as a Senator in the first South African government, and was responsible for most of the development at Hartford. His brother, Sir Frederick, was the last prime minister of the Colony of Natal prior to Union. He was the only man to emerge from the Union talks in 1908 with a knighthood, for his efforts in bringing about what we know today as the Republic of South Africa.

In its time, Moor has accommodated two Prime Ministers, the last of the colony of Natal, and the first of the Union of South Africa, General Louis Botha.

Of interest in this suite is the old marble bath, which was reputedly imported into South Africa from Malaysia towards the latter end of the 18th century, then found its way into the Durban Club, and eventually into this bathroom, together with the old church window installed alongside.

One of South Africa’s greatest artists, the late Errol Boyley, is remembered throughout the manor house in numerous fine examples, several of which were included in the compendium of his best works. Errol was a great friend of Summerhill and Hartford, and, somewhat unusually for this committed landscapist, he also portrayed Cheryl Goss in two oils which appear in the suite as well.